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Nearly synonymous with the evolution of open source software, the LAMP stack was the de facto standard for years. The combination of Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP was a must for any individual interested in having a Linux system administration job or web application development. Each of these components was in such a demanding position that it appeared it was a combination that would have legs for years to come. Sure, technological advancements happen at a rapid pace and the scenery is ever changing, but it was tough to envision a world that did not include the LAMP stack. To this day, it is still widely used, but based on the numbers, it is in decline.

There has been concern for nearly five years application servers are dead. Truth be told, they are not dead, but is their usage in decline? The simple answer is yes. Over the years, it appears corporate environments have decided the "return on investment" is not there when looking at Java application servers. On the surface, one might assume that the likes of WebSphere or WebLogic might be the ones in decline due to cost. Perhaps it is just affecting the proprietary choices, while their open source based derivatives are growing or remaining steady? Appears not. Whichever Java application server you choose, all of them are in a state of decline.

in-demand software depeloper skills
The application space is the place to be. A lot of work has been done in the low-level Linux arena, and it continues, but the growth over the last few years has been in the application space. With that being the case, which language are developers utilizing to build these apps? In short, it depends, which I know does not come as a huge surprise. But, with the data that we have, we are able to determine which languages are leading the way.

The language that finds itself on the top of the mountain is Java. Being around open source software for over 15 years, this was not always the case. Early on, we did not see a lot of interest in Java developers, but boy has that changed. It is the definitive leader in the application space currently. While the numbers have not grown in the last six quarters, the sheer overall number is impressive. On average, companies are asking for Java skills in over 1 in 3 job postings focused on FLOSS. Quite a feat for a language that did not register on the radar years ago. And, based on its heavy use with Android, it would not be a surprise to see this number increase in the future.

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